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[Radio Health Journal] Offshoring Medication: Where Are Your Generic Drugs Being Made?

Radio Health Journal recently published a segment featuring Rena Conti, Associate Professor of Markets, Public Policy, and Law, discussing her recent research focused on generic drug production.

Rena Conti

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August 28, 2022

Radio Health Journal recently published a segment featuring Rena Conti, Associate Professor of Markets, Public Policy, and Law, discussing her recent research focused on generic drug production.

Georgetown University’s Health Policy Institute reported recently that 66% of U.S. adults use prescription drugs. High competition in the drug market has resulted in the growth of generic drugs, which are also licensed by the Food & Drug Administration. Because of the high cost of brand name drugs, consumers tend to prefer these cheaper, more accessible generic drugs despite less public information about their origins. Rena and her co-researchers examined this phenomenon, stating,

“What I have been concerned about is that there appear to be some significant challenges with transparency. Most notably, American consumers can find out where their food is made, where many other things that they use everyday are made, and who they’re made by. But, the US consumers don’t actually know who are making very intimate important consumer products who keep ourselves well – prescription drugs – and we cant shop for quality here because we really don’t know where these products were made, and by whom”

Rena M. Conti is an Associate Professor at the Boston University Questrom School of Business. From 2006 through June 2018, Professor Conti was an Associate Professor of Health Economics and Policy at the University of Chicago Medical School and the Harris School of Public Policy. She is a health economist and her research focuses on the organization, financing and regulation of medical care. She has written extensively on the pricing, demand and supply of prescription drugs.