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Epinephrine Autoinjector Costs Remain High for Some Patients with Private Insurance

ealio recently published an article featuring research from Rena Conti, Associate Professor of Markets, Public Policy, and Law, on the prices of epinephrine autoinjectors, which are used to combat life-threatening allergic reactions, remaining high for many depending on insurance.

Rena Conti

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July 15, 2022

Healio recently published an article featuring research from Rena Conti, Associate Professor of Markets, Public Policy, and Law, on the prices of epinephrine autoinjectors, which are used to combat life-threatening allergic reactions, remaining high for many depending on insurance.

In a study measuring 657,813 patients enrolled in epinephrine autoinjector fills, Rena and Kao-Ping Chua, MD, PhD, examined employer-sponsored insurance claims. They found that generic autoinjector brands preserved efficacy but at a lower price, leading them to advise doctors to prescribe nonbranded autoinjectors to their patients. Kao-Ping emphasized this point, saying that, “to mitigate these problems, doctors should prescribe the epinephrine autoinjector with the lowest list price when deciding between products.”

Ultimately, Rena and her co-author argue that with the availability of lower-priced drugs, patient out-of-pocket spending will likely decrease.

Rena M. Conti is an Associate Professor at the Boston University Questrom School of Business. From 2006 through June 2018, Professor Conti was an Associate Professor of Health Economics and Policy at the University of Chicago Medical School and the Harris School of Public Policy. She is a health economist and her research focuses on the organization, financing and regulation of medical care. She has written extensively on the pricing, demand and supply of prescription drugs.