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Future of Work

Has Hybridity Killed Teamwork?

INSEAD Knowledge recently published insight coauthored by Constance Noonan Hadley, Lecturer of Management and Organizations, on the rise of hybridity in the workforce and how it has altered the use of teamwork.

Constance Hadley

Published

on

May 24, 2022

INSEAD Knowledge recently published insight coauthored by Constance Noonan Hadley, Lecturer of Management and Organizations, on the rise of hybridity in the workforce and how it has altered the use of teamwork.

In the article, Constance and her coauthor elaborate on the history of teamwork and why it is important for organizations to reconsider the costs and benefits of fostering it. The authors found that a great deal of time and energy must be spent on coordinating the work; establishing a healthy balance and resolving conflicts; aligning motivations and efforts; and putting together combined deliverables. When some of a team’s members work global, remotely, or in the office, hybrid models multiply all of these known costs significantly. In light of these important factors, the authors proposed a way to reduce some of these costs by creating more cohesive teams and breaking down tasks into smaller ones, stating,

“This type of configuration still requires plenty of coordination – perhaps even more so. Yet the process becomes more streamlined and controllable.”

Connie Noonan Hadley is an organizational psychologist and lecturer in the Management and Organizations Department at Boston University’s Questrom School of Business. She teaches graduate courses in topics such as teamwork, leadership, and negotiations. She holds a PhD in organizational behavior from Harvard University, an MBA in human resource and strategic management from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, and a BA in social psychology from Princeton University. Previously, she worked in the fields of management consulting at McKinsey & Company and in marketing and operations at General Mills, Inc. Dr. Hadley’s research has been published in Harvard Business Review, MIT Sloan Management Review,The Leadership Quarterly, Human Relations, and Group & Organization Management, and her work has been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, Wired, and other media outlets. One of her favorite extracurricular activities is serving as faculty advisor to The Internship Fund for Social Impact, a student-led initiative to support social impact internships around the world.

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